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Washington: Camping at Hoh Rain Forest in the Olympic National Park

After a couple of days in Seattle, Washington, it was time to get back in the wilderness. Surprisingly, the weather was better in the Olympic National Park than in the city of Seattle. I arrived at the Olympic National Park to temperatures above eighty degrees, and blue skies. Leaving Seattle around eight o’clock in the morning, it was a nice drive up to the Olympic rain forest. Having visited the Hoh Rain Forest in the years that I lived in Seattle in the mid nineties, I was in familiar territory. Great memories from past visits and a sense of ‘returning home’. A couple of miles before entering the park, I stopped for firewood and coffee. What a great surprise! It was the best cappuccino I got in over a month on the road.

Mount Olympus seen in the background - Olympic Peninsula in the State of Washington
Mount Olympus seen in the background – Olympic Peninsula in the State of Washington

 

Camping site by the Hoh River - Hoh National Forest in the Olympic National Park, State of Washington
Camping site by the Hoh River – Hoh National Forest in the Olympic National Park, State of Washington

I had not made a reservation for a camping site close to the visitor center adjacent to the Hall of Mosses, and I was lucky to get a permit to camp there overnight. With a camping permit, I drove around the campground hoping for a site by the water. After looping around a couple of time, I spotted a couple leaving from a campsite that had absolutely the best view. They told me that they were not camping there; they had just been sitting there having a picnic lunch. When they apologized for sitting at the site, I told them that I was so grateful for they having held the best spot by the Hoh River for me. Otherwise, it would have been taken. Location is everything!

Looking at Mount Olympus covered by snow on a clear day is an overwhelming sight. Getting to its summit is a dream of hikers and climbers. I thought I would attempt to reach the Blue Glaciers, but I soon found out that it would not be possible. When I tried to get information on how to get the wilderness camping permit, which should be obtained in person in Port Angeles at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center, I was told by the park ranger that they were not issuing permits for camping above Lewis Meadows. She told me that they had the more snow fall in that Winter than they had in any year of the past fifteen years. She also told me that the rangers had not made to the Blue Glaciers yet because most of the trails were compromised by washed out bridges, erosions, and fallen trees. She suggested me to get a camping permit from her, to camp at Lewis Meadows which is located along the river at 10.5 miles. From there, she advised me to try a day hike as far up I could safely get. Putting in perspective, the summit of Mount Olympus is at 17.3 miles on the Hoh River Trail. Obviously, the closer to the summit, the more difficult. In the Spring and early Summer, steep snow slopes are found along the Hoh River Trail between Elk Lake and Glacier Meadows. Until early Summer, ice axe and crampons may be required and good handling of map and compass is needed because parts of the trail may be covered in snow. The ranger told me that although we were already in the Spring, avalanche chutes were hazards making it a risky for even experienced hikers and mountaineers. Knowing that the best safety tool is common sense, I knew that I could only attempt to get to the Blue Glaciers. However, at the ranger station I was warned that not even that might be possible because the rangers had not been there yet. The ranger who I spoke with had not spoken with any hiker who may made it that far up.

Scenery along the Hall of Mosses Trail - Hoh Rain Forest in the Olympic National Park, State of Washington
Scenery along the Hall of Mosses Trail – Hoh Rain Forest in the Olympic National Park, State of Washington

 

Trees in the Hall of Mosses Trail - Hoh Rain Forest
Trees in the Hall of Mosses Trail – Hoh Rain Forest

I decided to go for a walk in the Hall of Mosses Trail, which despite being a loop trail just 0.8 mile long, offers spectacular views of gigantic trees covered in mosses. This area can be crowed because it is a short, ease trail that most of the visitors to the park are able to hike. Many visitors complain that it is too crowded and it takes away the magic of the forest. It is true that many visitors enjoy the fact that the trail is easily accessible and it is not a challenging hike either. However, it can get crowded! An early hike, around seven in the morning, is the best way to avoid the crowd. Unfortunately, some visitors ignore the fact that silence is important to enjoy the sounds of the forest, and one can get stuck with loud groups that can be heard from yards away. I was lucky! I only encountered a handful of people on the trail, perhaps because it was sunny and warm. Many people prefer to visit the Hall of Mosses on cloudy, foggy days. They say it is more magical. I have walked through the Hall of Mosses in cloudy days, foggy days, rainy days, and sunny days. Although I enjoyed every time I visited, under different weather conditions, I liked finally walking through the forest in a sunny day because the bright light filtered through the canopies highlighted the vitality of so many shades of green.

The Hall of Mosses Trail elevation is only about 100 feet, and after an initial elevation the trail flattens. The trail is lined with old trees, mostly big leaf maples and Sitka spruces draped in moss.Considered the only rain forest in North America, the rich ecosystem form the perfect habitat for several species of organisms that sustain the balanced environment of the forest. Fragile, yet rich! Its uniqueness resides in its life cycle where fallen trees become ‘nurse logs’. The Hoh Rain Forest receives up to 14 feet of rain per year.

Hall of Mosses Trail at the Hoh Rain Forest - Olympic National Park, Washington
Hall of Mosses Trail at the Hoh Rain Forest – Olympic National Park, Washington

My campsite’s location was superb! I fell asleep to the sound of the waters rolling on the shallow bed of the Hoh River. My tent was less than 10 feet from the water. After spending a couple of hours stargazing by the fire, as I laid down in the dark made me feel as if I were surrounded by the water or in the middle of the river. If I kept my eyes open, I could still see the stars through the tent. That’s how bright the stars appeared above. I knew that I the ten mile hike to Lewis Meadows ahead of me the next day was going to be difficult. I had to get a good night of sleep and be ready in the early morning.

Hoh River at the Olympic National Park - Forks, Washington
Hoh River at the Olympic National Park – Forks, Washington

 

 

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One thought on “Washington: Camping at Hoh Rain Forest in the Olympic National Park

  1. […] to fall into deep creeks or holes was to high. Coming from a much more experienced hiker in the Olympic Peninsula who was native to the region and worked for a wildlife protection organization, I decided to follow […]

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