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Solitude at Point Reyes

Getting up wasn’t ease! After backpacking to Glen Camp I fell asleep early, waking up only once and briefly in the middle of the night. The gentle sound of the waves breaking on the beach a couple of miles away put me right back to sleep. I woke up sore and my legs were so sore and tight that it took me a few minutes to start moving. I checked the time and was shocked to find out that it was past nine in the morning. Had I slept for more than twelve hours?

Walking out of the tent I found that the few campers I heard the night before had already left. Except for one who was getting her backpacking gear ready for the trail, the camp was practically empty. As we said hello, I told her that I could not believe that it was almost ten o’clock. She looked at me a little confused and told me that it was only six-thirty. “Wow!” – I said!  That made more sense because I can hardly ever sleep more than eight hours.

Something made cellphone reset the time to Eastern Time! After chatting for a brief moment, we said goodbye wishing one another a great day as she strapped her backpack on and off she went. As I walked back to my tent I saw her disappearing in the woods, leaving me all alone at Glen Camp getting ready to hike along the shore.

View from the Stewart Trail - Backpacking at Point Reyes National Seashore
View from the Stewart Trail – Point Reyes National Seashore

I was feeling really well and looking forward to hike at least ten miles. Since the trails along the shore at Point Reyes National Seashore are relatively ease, being sore shouldn’t be a problem. I knew that after my body warmed up I would be fine. While getting ready for the day’s hike, for the first time, I noticed that my left eye was itchy. I thought that I might have got some poison oak in my eye and before medicating it I sought relief by washing it with cold water.

It was a beautiful day with clear blue skies and it promised to be a great hike! I left the campground backpacking lighter than the day before, heading south on the Glen Trail, then west on Stewart Trail. Combined, the first stretch toward the shore was a hike of just over a mile and half before heading north on the Coast Trail. The strong winds from the night before seemed to have slowed down and the only sound was that of birds songs.

 

View from the Coast Trail - Backpacking at Point Reyes National Seashore
View from the Coast Trail – Point Reyes National Seashore

I hiked for over two hours and I encountered nobody! The trails were deserted. What I noticed the day before, remained true today; the trails had not been used as the Winter was barely over. The overgrown bushes made it difficult to spot the trails closer to the ocean. Nonetheless, that was a small price to pay for the absolute solitude and peace that I was enjoying.

Located north on the Coast Trail was Arch Rock. The two-mile path to Arch Rock was a combination of meadows and marshlands with their own micro ecosystem. Birds everywhere! As I neared Arch Rock a sign posted on the trail leading to the site warned that the access to the rock had been closed due to a fatal accident at the cliff. Yes, I was disappointed! Instead of getting to Arch Rock, I sat on the cliff and admired it from a distance.  From that point, I continued on hiking north on the Coast Trail.

 

View of the shoreline on the Coast Trail - Point Reyes National Seashore
View of the shoreline on the Coast Trail – Point Reyes National Seashore

 

Kelkam Beach - Backpacking at Point Reyes National Seashore, California
Kelham Beach – Point Reyes National Seashore, California

I had snacked a few times in the almost four miles hiked thus far, planning to stop for lunch and take a longer break at the beach. Kelham Beach was only about a mile north on the Coast Trail.

Kelham Beach - Backpacking at Point Reyes National Seashore
Kelham Beach – Point Reyes National Seashore, California

Just as I was getting back on trail I heard someone whistling and as I turned around I saw the girl that I had talked to at the campground a couple of hours earlier. She told me that she also had not seen anyone else on the trails. Apparently we had the coastline of the park to ourselves. A few more minutes of chat and off we went in opposite directions.

 

Lunch break at Kelham Beach - Backpacking at Point Reyes National Seashore, California
Lunch break at Kelham Beach – Point Reyes National Seashore, California

In the deserted, windy and cold beach I had my lunch consisting of canned tuna fish and a banana for dessert. After a half hour break I continued north on the Coast Trail to Sculptured Beach. The two and a half miles portion of this trail from Kelham Beach to Sculptured Beach is an ease hike with astounding views of the ocean. The cooling breeze made it a pleasant hike through the meadows with perhaps only about a quarter of a mile in a narrow wet path that was taken over by the swamp vegetation. Some of the grassy plants had long a sharp blades and except for a momentary doubt about whether or not I was still on the trail, the experience wasn’t too bad.

Arriving at the beach a barefoot walk on the cold, wet sand was refreshing and soothing. I had hiked approximately seven miles and I was in no rush to return to Glen Camp. I had no reason to return to the campground before sunset. In the more than eight hours since I started my day, I saw and spoke with only one person. This was priceless!

Sculptured Beach - Backpacking at Point Reyes National Seashore, California
Sculptured Beach – Point Reyes National Seashore, California

From the Shores to the Mountains

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