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Rosh Hanikra: Beyond the Gay Hotspot of Tel Aviv

Beyond Tel Aviv the options for sightseeing day trips are limitless and only certain borders can stop you! Add the fact that short distances is one of Israel’s conveniences for travelers, there is no excuse not to leave this gay mecca for a day or two. One of these getaway options is Rosh HaNikra, located on the border with Lebanon. It is only 130 Km from Tel Aviv which can be covered in just under a two-hour drive. After a day trip to the northern border, one can be back in time to enjoy the great nightlife in Israel’s most famous and vibrant gay hotspot.

Sitting on the border with Lebanon on the western Galilee by the Mediterranean, Rosh HaNikra is best known for the grottoes, although its history reveals that there is a lot more to it. Its name in Hebrew literally means “head of the grottoes”.

Grottoes in Rosh HaNikra, Israel
Grottoes in Rosh HaNikra, Israel

Additionally, this soft chalk rocks geological site of cavernous tunnels formed by the forces of the sea, has great historical, strategic trade and defense importance. The border crossing is today closed to Israeli and Lebanese civilians, but that was not always the case. Yet, nowadays, standing close enough to the border crossing the grottoes of Rosh HaNikra is as close to crossing into Lebanon as one can get.

Rosh HaNikra functioned as a passage for trade caravans and armies between Lebanon, Syria, Israel, Egypt, and Africa. Railway tunnels were blasted through nearby rocks by the South African forces during World War II, allowing trains to run through the Cairo-Istanbul line. In 1946, the Haganah spared the bridge during its operation known as the Night of the Bridges. However, in February of 1948 the 21st Battalion of the British army destroyed the bridge to prevent Lebanese shipment of arms to the Arab forces fighting against the UN Partition Plan. Later on the tunnels were sealed. On the Lebanese side, the railway have been dismantled almost completely and the Israeli Coastal Railway ends near Nahariya to the south of Rosh HaNikra.

Carvernous grottoes of Rosh HaNikra in the Israeli-Lebanese, Israel
Cavernous grottoes of Rosh HaNikra in the Israeli-Lebanese, Israel

In 1949, beyond Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and modern Israel’s young political centers, Rosh Hanikra was the place where Israeli and Lebanese officials met and reached an armistice agreement that brought to an end the Lebanese-Israeli conflict over the 1948 War of Independence of Israel.

Border crossing at the Israeli-Lebanese UN Blue Line Zone at Rosh HaNikra, Israel
Border crossing at the Israeli-Lebanese UN Blue Line Zone at Rosh HaNikra, Israel

Today, the border crossing at Rosh HaNikra is only used by the UNIFIL (United Nations Interim Forces in Lebanon). However, not until long ago, before the insurgency of Hezbollah in southern Lebanon and its constant attempts to attack northern Israel, thousands of Lebanese used to cross into Israel to work mainly in agriculture. Locals in the region attest that the current situation hurts both sides as Israel’s agricultural industry needs workers from Lebanon and Lebanese workers have lost one of their source of income.

Road on the hill at the Israeli-Lebanese border in the Blue Line zone at Rosh HaNikra, Israel
Road on the hill at the Israeli-Lebanese border in the Blue Line zone at Rosh HaNikra, Israel

Despite the concerns over eventual attacks coming from southern Lebanon, the area is relatively calm and of astounding beauty. Standing at Rosh HaNikra one can enjoy the view of Israel looking south at the beach along the Mediterranean coast. At the same, looking north on the hill, it is quite surreal to see the dirt road that separates the two countries and that is only used by boarder patrolling and UN personnel in the Blue Line created in May 2000 after Israel withdrew from southern Lebanon. Nonetheless, Rosh HaNikra is a great destination for a day trip or to be visited as part of a multi-days itinerary in the northwestern region of the Galilee..

View of Israel looking south from Rosh HaNikra, Israel
View of Israel looking south from Rosh HaNikra, Israel

Visiting Rosh HaNikra in March had pros and cons. The wintry conditions with high winds and a bit chilly makes it a bit unconvertible, mainly on top the of the cliff e descending to the grottoes in the cable car. On the other hand, it is a lot less crowded than in late Spring and Summer. In any case, if it is just a day scape beyond Tel Aviv, it is worthwhile to take the trip north. And by the end of the day back in Tel Aviv the options abound for a great evening out to enjoy this city that has been hailed as one of the greatest gay hotspot and destination in the world.

Chalk rocks sculpted by the sea in Rosh HaNikra, Israel
Chalk rocks sculpted by the sea in Rosh HaNikra, Israel
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