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Crater Lake: Winter Wonderland and Beyond

A Winter wonderland in Oregon! Officially it was Spring, but not at Crater Lake National Park. The park was still closed allowing access to the public only in limited areas. The temperature was only twenty-nine degrees with snow still falling. Periodically, the fast moving clouds would allow the blue skies to be seen through the clouds. It would in a matter of minutes give way to snow and gray skies. The dome in the middle of the crater looked majestic in its insular silent isolation. Aside from a few people here and there, the wind which blew in intermittent whistling gusts was the only sound that broke the silence.

Crater Lake, Oregon
Crater Lake, Oregon

Located at the crest of the Cascade Mountain Range, Crater Lake National Park is, according to the park’s brochure, one of the snowiest inhabited places in America. Since the ranger’s service began tracking snow falls in the park in 1931, the 1930’s was the snowiest period receiving an average 614 inches of snow during that decade.

Winter Wonderland at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon
Winter Wonderland at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

Overall, the average annual snowfall at the park’s headquarters, by decade, has been on a downward trend. The lowest snowfall per decade was registered in the 2010’s which averaged on 377 inches: the decade of the 2000’s averaged 455 inches per year. The 2014-2015 Winter/Spring season registered the lowest ever snowfall, receiving only 43 feet of snow. The consequences of declining snowfalls could be catastrophic to the ecosystem in the region. Besides feeding the Rogue, Umpqua, and Klamath Rivers, the very existence of the lake in the crater is dependent on water that comes from the sky. The lake in the crater does is not fed by rivers or streams and less snow and less rain could significantly change the landscape in the caldera at the mountain top.

Hiking and snowshoeing were out of the question as the trail surrounding the lake was closed. On the other hand, it was encouraging to know that the snowfall level was higher than that of the prior year. And as all camping sites where I could camp were relatively too far from the lake, it was time to wrap up my short visit to the park. After taking some pictures around the lake and visiting the coffee shop and the restroom, which looked more like a military underground bunker, it was time to get on the road before it got late and dark to drive down from the mountain top. Spending the night in Klamath Falls before heading to the coast on my way to Portland, Oregon was the best plan for the night.

Until now, this was the most complicated part of the road trip. I had reached a point of exhaustion and I was feeling a bit homesick. Perhaps the weather condition was making me feel a little anxious, because it was getting more and more difficult to find a national park that was open for camping and hiking. The distances to travel in a day to reach the next destination was getting longer and longer with nothing in between to make for a great stop. Undeniably, the landscape couldn’t be more appealing to the eye. However, with sorter Winter days, I could not afford to remain in one location for too long before getting dark. Even short distances became long because the driving conditions were not good.Traveling alone in Winter conditions requires a little more caution and coffee. The music and a cup of coffee were the only comfort to keep me company.

It was getting dark when I left Crater Lake and as I came down the mountain, the snow had given way to freezing rain. With a hotel reserved in Klamath Falls, I knew that I had a bed and a much needed hot shower waiting for me. The rain had stopped when I arrived at the hotel, but it was windy and cold. After checking in, I headed out to try and have dinner. It was already past ten and the only place still serving some food in town was an Irish tavern. The food was not anything to brag about, but it was the first time I had a hot meal in five days. Besides, after hiking all that I hiked in the past few days, I could absorb some fatty food.

At the rim of the lake at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon
At the rim of the lake at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

The next morning I got up early and tried the breakfast that was included with my room. It was not a good breakfast! Everything seemed to be prepackaged food and even the coffee was not drinkable. Nonetheless, it was my chance to do laundry at the hotel that morning and reorganize the car. I knew that from that point on, I would need to make the winter clothes more accessible. A search about the destinations I had mind in the Pacific Northwest revealed that most of them were still closed. It crossed my mind to turn around and head south, but I was determined to make it to Seattle.

I left Klamath Falls knowing that it was going to be a long drive to Portland, Oregon. Trying to avoid the snowy day in the mountains, I decided to take Route 38 heading west to US-101 northbound. Before getting to the coastline, I stopped in Elkton to have a real, old American style breakfast for lunch. After a quick stop to watch some of the local wildlife, I drove west toward the Pacific shores again. Still without a hotel reservation in Portland, I was open to the idea of finding a place to camp somewhere between Dunes City and Florence.

Elks in Elkton, Oregon
Elks in Elkton, Oregon
Seashore nearby Florence, Oregon
Seashore nearby Florence, Oregon

Back home in New York, Eric was a little worried about this part of my road trip. We were constantly in contact with each other and discussing the weather conditions and the obstacles that I was starting to encounter. He continued to motivate me to push on and at the same time he wanted to make sure that I was safe, staying warm, and most importantly; having a good time.

It turned out that Dunes City was just a drive through at that time of the year. Nothing was happening there. By the time I made it to Florence, I had called Eric and he made a reservation for me in Portland. Now I would have to make to Portland no matter how late I would arrive there. Trying to find a place to explore and enjoy had become a waste of time.

It was around mid afternoon that I found, almost by accident, the Sea Lion Caves on US-101, Florence, Oregon. I had never heard about the Oregon’s Sea Lion Caves, which is one of the largest in the world. It turned out to be a great surprise on the road. It brought me back to a better mood and my visit to the caves made me forget the somewhat exhausting, worrisome last couple of days. Hundreds of sea lions were in the caves that day. Watching tens of them swimming the strong waves and trying to make to the caves or to climb on the rocks was a spectacular, rare event.

Sea Lions in the Sea Lion Caves in Florence, Oregon
Sea Lions in the Sea Lion Caves in Florence, Oregon

Feeling somehow energized I got back on the road toward Portland. The plan was to stay in Portland for just one night as a stop over because my next destination where I planned to camp was Fort Stevens in the mouth of the Columbia River, before crossing into Washington. I arrived in Portland under heavy rain and checked into the hotel just before nine that evening. It felt good to be off the road! It was time order some take out food, download the pictures, and recharge batteries.

Lighthouse under thick mist nearby Florence, Oregon
Lighthouse under thick mist nearby Florence, Oregon

 

From the Shores to the Mountains

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